Cavernous Sinus

Cavernous Sinus

Cavernous Sinus

Each cavernous sinus is a large venous space situated in the middle cranial fossa on either side of the body of the sphenoid bone. Its interior is divided into a number of trabeculae or caverns. The floor of the sinus is formed by the endosteal dura mater. The lateral wall, roof and medial wall are formed by the meningeal dura mater.

Structures in the lateral wall of the sinus from above downwards:

  1. Oculomotor nerve
  2. Trochlear nerve
  3. Ophthalmic nerve - in the anterior part of the sinus, it divides into the lacrimal, frontal and nasociliary nerves.
  4. Maxillary nerve - it leaves the sinus by passing through the foramen rotundum on its way to the pterygopalatine fossa.
  5. Trigeminal ganglion - the ganglion and its dural cave project into the posterior part of the lateral wall of the sinus.

Structures passing through the centre of the sinus:

  1. Internal carotid artery with the venous and sympathetic plexus around it.
  2. Abducent nerve, inferolateral to the internal carotid artery.

Tributaries (incoming channels) of cavernous sinus

  1. Superior ophthalmic vein.
  2. A branch of inferior ophthalmic vein or sometimes vein itself.
  3. Central vein of retina (it may also drain into superior ophthalmic vein).
  4. Superficial middle cerebral vein.
  5. Inferior cerebral vein.
  6. Sphenoparietal sinus.
  7. Frontal trunk of middle meningeal vein (it may also drain into pterygoid plexus or into sphenoparietal sinus).

Draining channels (communications) of cavernous sinus

  1. Into transverse sinus through superior petrosal sinus.
  2. Into internal jugular vein through inferior petrosal sinusand through a plexus around the ICA
  3. Into pterygoid plexus of veinsthrough emissary veins.
  4. Into facial vein through superior ophthalmic vein.
  5. Right and left cavernous sinus communicates with each other by anterior and posterior intercavernous sinuses and through basilar plexus of veins.

 

Related Questions Cross Sectional Anatomy

Cavernous Sinus

Each cavernous sinus is a large venous space situated in the middle cranial fossa on either side of the body of the sphenoid bone. Its interior is divided into a number of trabeculae or caverns. The floor of the sinus is formed by the endosteal dura mater. The lateral wall, roof and medial wall are formed by the meningeal dura mater.

Structures in the lateral wall of the sinus from above downwards:

  1. Oculomotor nerve
  2. Trochlear nerve
  3. Ophthalmic nerve - in the anterior part of the sinus, it divides into the lacrimal, frontal and nasociliary nerves.
  4. Maxillary nerve - it leaves the sinus by passing through the foramen rotundum on its way to the pterygopalatine fossa.
  5. Trigeminal ganglion - the ganglion and its dural cave project into the posterior part of the lateral wall of the sinus.

Structures passing through the centre of the sinus:

  1. Internal carotid artery with the venous and sympathetic plexus around it.
  2. Abducent nerve, inferolateral to the internal carotid artery.

Tributaries (incoming channels) of cavernous sinus

  1. Superior ophthalmic vein.
  2. A branch of inferior ophthalmic vein or sometimes vein itself.
  3. Central vein of retina (it may also drain into superior ophthalmic vein).
  4. Superficial middle cerebral vein.
  5. Inferior cerebral vein.
  6. Sphenoparietal sinus.
  7. Frontal trunk of middle meningeal vein (it may also drain into pterygoid plexus or into sphenoparietal sinus).

Draining channels (communications) of cavernous sinus

  1. Into transverse sinus through superior petrosal sinus.
  2. Into internal jugular vein through inferior petrosal sinusand through a plexus around the ICA
  3. Into pterygoid plexus of veinsthrough emissary veins.
  4. Into facial vein through superior ophthalmic vein.
  5. Right and left cavernous sinus communicates with each other by anterior and posterior intercavernous sinuses and through basilar plexus of veins.